Mindfulness

Three Ways a Coach Can Support Your Pregnancy

For those of you who are pregnant, thinking about pregnancy or supporting someone who’s pregnant — this one’s for you!

Pregnancy comes with its fair share of new experiences. Emotions, energy, hunger, and nutrient needs shift tremendously depending on what stage of pregnancy you’re in and having a coach in your corner can help you confidently navigate this profound change. Here’s how:

1. Mindset shifts. When you’re pregnant, the focus needs to be on providing your body with the energy it needs to support a healthy baby. This can be a huge adjustment if you’re used to eating to manipulate performance and/or body composition. Pregnancy gives you the chance to step back and reassess your intentions. Having a coach who can work with you to set new goals and provide new focus is extremely powerful. Your coach may ask questions like:

  • What are you training for?
  • What do you want for your pregnancy?
  • What do you want for your birth?

It should feel empowering to know that you have a great deal of control over your health and over the health of your little one. A coach can help you reconnect to these goals when you need a little reminder!

2. Your coach can ensure you’re giving your body enough energy. Did you know that the average pregnant woman needs about 300 extra calories a day to support her baby?[1] Your increased calorie needs are based on your current weight and activity level, so it can be tricky to know if you’re getting enough. And it should come as no surprise that your calorie needs increase as you move through each trimester.[2] Sharing your mood changes along with your hunger, energy and stress levels with your coach will ensure you’re not undereating or eating more than you need to.

3. Your body needs specific nutrients. Increased protein needs and a focus on healthy fats and complex carbs are just the beginning. There are many key micronutrients that your body needs in higher amounts during pregnancy. A coach can guide you through the ins and outs of choosing a prenatal vitamin and ensure that you’re getting a variety of foods that supply key nutrients such as:

  • Choline
  • L-Methylfolate
  • Calcium
  • Magnesium
  • Iodine
  • Iron
  • EPA & DHA
  • Vitamins A, D3, K2, B12

[3,4,5,6]


If you want to learn more about nutrition during pregnancy, check out our 
WAG Q&A with CEO Adee for some more tips on eating during pregnancy!

There are so many changes that are going on in your body and letting a coach handle questions about your nutrition will allow you to focus on what is most important — truly enjoying such a transformative and incredible nine months.


Resources:

  1. Kominiarek, M. A., & Rajan, P. (2016). Nutrition Recommendations in Pregnancy and Lactation. The Medical Clinics of North America, 100(6), 1199–1215.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5104202/
  2. Marangoni, F., Cetin, I., Verduci, E., Canzone, G., Giovannini, M., Scollo, P., … Poli, A. (2016). Maternal Diet and Nutrient Requirements in Pregnancy and Breastfeeding. An Italian Consensus Document. Nutrients, 8(10), 629. http://doi.org/10.3390/nu8100629
  3. Mennitti, L. V., Oliveira, J. L., Morais, C. A., Estadella, D., Oyama, L. M., Oller, C. M., & Pisani, L. P. (2015, February). Type of fatty acids in maternal diets during pregnancy and/or lactation and metabolic consequences of the offspring. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25459884
  4. Leung, A. M., Pearce, E. N., & Braverman, L. E. (2011). Iodine Nutrition in Pregnancy and Lactation. Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America, 40(4), 765–777. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecl.2011.08.001
  5. US Prev Serv (2006). Recommendation Summary. Retrieved from https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/UpdateSummaryFinal/iron-deficiency-anemia-screening
  6. Asemi, Z., Karamali, M., Jamilian, M., Foroozanfard, F., Bahmani, F., Heidarzadeh, Z., Esmaillzadeh, A. (2015). Magnesium supplementation affects metabolic status and pregnancy outcomes in gestational diabetes: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 102(1), 222-229. doi:10.3945/ajcn.114.098616

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